Blog: Off-grid

Sunshine on a Covered Deck?

This deck was a joy to design and build. The customers wanted to expand their outdoor living space, and they already had the deck there but wanted a covered area where they could bbq and hang out. Since the deck is on the back of the house in a shady area, they wanted to maximize the available light. This lead their decision to install clear roofing material, giving them shelter from the weather while still letting the sun through! The best part is that they are my neighbors, so from time to time, I will be able to go over and enjoy the space myself!

This deck is on an off-grid home in the Slocan Valley. I have had the pleasure of working on a few other projects in this house, and it’s great to see how the longevity of my workmanship is holding up over the years. I’ve been keen to watch how various exterior and interior finishes have held up, especially on highly exposed areas outdoors or high traffic areas indoors, as this helps me to offer other clients the best choices for quality finishes and application methods.

 

Hybrid Post & Beam

Working with rounds is a lot different than working with square timbers. Layout is completely different: working off of chalk lines and carving the rounds down to square posts at the joinery took a lot longer than just working with square timbers.

Making the braces was a challenge in precision – getting the square part carved perfectly to fit the housing and then adding 45 degree cuts in the end really gave me a challenge! I cut all of the log joinery using a chainsaw to rough out the joints and then cleaned them up with an angle grinder fitted with a sanding disk.

The customer really liked the round look, so we used round logs for the posts and braces to give the house an open concept log home feel. However, since the square beams were faster to layout and cut, the hybrid of both square with round was the solution we came up with to work within budget.

This home will be an off-grid straw bale home, with clay plaster.